16th Century German Dress

I wrote a nice long diary post about this dress, and LJ (I originally wrote this post on LiveJournal) very meanly ate it.  I am in no mood to retype it, but I still want to share pictures.  So here you go, the much shorter version:

I wanted to make a dress.  These are images of the sort of dress I wanted to make.  Also, it was the day before Pennsic. I had to work fast.

Portraits of the Married Couple Schwetzer (detail) Landsknecht with his Wife

Yay pattern.  It is the same as the pattern I used for this blue Italian dress.

Dress Pattern

Dress guards are awesome.

Bodice In Progress

Ran out of time at home.  Have to finish dress at war now.

Front Guards: Sewing

I sewed pretty guards onto the skirt.  Then I sewed the skirt to the bodice.

Sewing Skirt Front Guards: Done
Done.  Mostly.  No closures yet.

Finished dress!

Still no closures.  I don’t care; I sew myself in anyways.

Lacing Up

I sewed myself in.  Who needs closures?  Awesome friend helps me pull the makeshift lacings tight.

Finished Dress

Yay done.  I look happy or something.

Dress with Apron

Still looking kind of happy.  Ignore the massive amounts of Italian-like qualities the outfit has.  I am still calling it my German dress.  Wearing this shift, and this apron.

Period Pyramid!

Bleg, still happy.  I guess it must have been a good dress.  I will be adding sleeves to it later for more German-y goodness.

Sorry for lame short post.  But I am happy to answer any questions you may have.

UPDATE: I just wanted to write a quick note here addressing the sleeves again.  Two years later, and I still have not added short sleeves to this dress like I had intended to do.  I still have the smidge of left over fabric for it, but now they are fairly different colors due to sunwear and washing on the dress.  Always attach your sleeves right away!

I am not too heart broken, since there are examples of sleeveless kirtles like this (here, here, here, and here), but it is not nearly as common as the short or long sleeved ones.

Posted in Clothes, Pre-1600's
One comment on “16th Century German Dress
  1. Farruggia says:

    Félicitations pour vos articles si précis !!!
    When will you do the same with french hennins or Breton clothes ?

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