Men in Antwerp

From about 1550 to 1570, Pieter Aertsen and Joachim Beuckelaer made a wonderful number of paintings depicting working class folk, selling in the market, working on the docks, and hanging out in their homes.  Though they did travel around a bit, it seems that most of the painting would have been based on people in Antwerp.  I am making some outfits for my husband and I based off of the paintings of the artists above.  I already started collecting and comparing the various parts of female dress, and here’s the companion post for the guys!

First up, hats!

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Brimless hats: mostly fuzzy/thrummed.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Brimmed! Some flat crowned, some round, some fuzzy, some not.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Flat caps! Red was a popular color that season.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Even some straw.

Hats are super common, although not quite the only option: there were several hatless men, mostly those sitting indoors.

Shirts!

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Rounded necklines, about collarbone length.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Collared shirts. Many of the ones with collars also have short ruffles.

I did not find a single image that showed bare shirt sleeves.  Not on children, not on men doing physical labor, not on dudes chilling out in their houses.  But there are several glimpses of white at the necklines and cuffs, so they definitely wore shirts next to their skin, but always with more layers on top.

Sleeveless Tunic/Vest/Jerkin

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Short Sleeved Tunic Thingy

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Long Sleeved Tunic/Doublet/Thing

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

I tried to pick out some that showed men just wearing the long sleeved tunic, but keep in mind that every single guy on this page is wearing long sleeves, even if under shorter sleeved garments.

Wrap-Over Closure

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

These short ones have various sleeve lengths, and some have collars, some don’t.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Long ones, mostly short sleeved.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

This guy has the clearest example of the wrap over top. Some are sort of V necked, but some like this guy almost look like collared doublets when the are done up. All of the ones I’ve seen in this style have splits in the front, from hem to waist, then the top flap covers the rest of the front opening. I cannot find any evidence of this style being closed with ties (only center-front opening have ties).

 Pants!

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Loose Pants seem quite popular! They tend to be gathered into a narrow waistband, and at least some appear to have a slit in the front, in the same place we would have a zipper normally. I have not seen any with codpieces.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Hose! Fairly tight, no gathering, always extend all the way down to the feet. Codpieces seem fairly common.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

So many hose, I had to make two pictures! So many different color options!

 Aprons!

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

Since these are guys often working very messy jobs, they have aprons to help cover their clothes, and wipe their hands on when things get dirty. Some of them wear the usual sort of apron, with the flap in the front attached to a waist band/apron strings. But many wear an interesting variation that looks like it goes all the way around the hips, gathered but with no visible waistband in any version that I can see. It almost looks like a drawstring construction. Many of them are striped or plaid.

I love that the guys outfits have simpler to understand layers compared to the ladies!  But still plenty of variation to play with: lots of color choices, sleeve lengths, neckline styles, hats, number of layers, loose and comfy or fitted and streamlined.

Clothing worn by men in Antwerp from 1550-1570, on MorganDonner.com

My main inspiration pictures!

The three pictures above are the ones that I want to replicate (at least loosely).  The two on the left are similar, while the right is quite different.

Stuff I need to make:

  1. Yellow front-opening tunic.
  2. Red sleeveless vest (perhaps lined in a light yellow to double up as the vest for the left image?).
  3. Fitted red hose.  The middle image looks like he might be wearing loose pants, but fitted will be fine too.
  4. Circular apron.
  5. Red hat (I already have a black one).
  6. Simple shirt with rounded neckline.
  7. Fancy shirt with ruffled collar of sexiness.
  8. Orange-brown paned pants and hose.
  9. Maybe a yellow doublet too.

Yay plans!  I’ll try to post process pictures soon!

 

 

 

 

I try to post my projects in an easy to read, dress diary type format. When I first started learning to sew historical outfits, I found dress diaries to be the most helpful learning tools. I want to contribute my projects in the hopes that they will prove just as useful for others.

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One comment on “Men in Antwerp
  1. Allison says:

    It looks like the first example of your wrap over closure closes with ties. Neat! The resolution is small and I’m not sure what image it came from but if you find the original in a high resolution you should be able to see the aiglet of the tie.

    Love the image compilations!

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